House Bill 2 Repeal Q&A

With the repeal of North Carolina's House Bill 2 (HB2) law and it now being replaced by HB142 (Session Law 2017-4), we wanted to clarify what this new law means in N.C. and specifically Raleigh.

HB142 repeals HB2 in its entirety and replaces it with the following three provisions, so we thought we'd clear up confusion on each with the following questions (you can also see updates since HB142 has passed here):

  1. No one is required to use the restroom corresponding to his/her/their birth certificate when in state-owned public facilities anymore.

    Q: What does this mean for my attendees while in Raleigh?

    A: Visitors and residents alike no longer are required to use the restroom corresponding to their birth certificates when in state-owned public facilities. All can use the bathroom they feel most comfortable entering. We go back to the way things were before HB2 passed.

  2. Any local municipality/city with nondiscrimination policies in effect prior to HB2 can keep them in effect now.

    Q: What does this mean for my attendees while in Raleigh?

    A: The City of Raleigh and Wake County have had nondiscrimination policies and ordinances prior to HB2 so those protections will now remain in place.

    The policies include protection against discrimination of perceived age, mental or physical disability, sex, religion, race, color, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, familial or marital status, economic status, veteran status or national origin in any aspect of modern life.

    As a matter of fact, the City of Raleigh has included sexual orientation in its nondiscrimination policies since 1988!

    It even requests and urges all citizens of Raleigh, individual and corporate, to use their power and influence to ensure Raleigh shall be a city of equal opportunity for all citizens.

    Click here to read the exact ordinance/law.

  3. No local municipality/city may write new or amend existing nondiscrimination policies and ordinances until 2020.

    Q: What does this mean for my attendees while in Raleigh?

    A: Since sexual orientation and gender identity or expression is currently protected under the City and County’s policies in effect, they are protected while in Raleigh as these policies cannot change until at least 2020.

    After 2020 the City of Raleigh or Wake County could then amend their existing policies or write new ordinances putting additional nondiscrimination policies into effect or providing additional equal rights protections if they so see fit. It’s a positive outcome, not a negative, after 2020 as some might have thought.

    Q: The City’s policy does not apply to the private sector, so how can you ensure my attendees are protected while visiting local establishments?

    A: As you can see from the fact that our city has been protecting the equal rights of the gay and lesbian community since 1988, Raleigh is a progressive and welcoming Southern capital city, one shaped by the passionate minds of its inclusive residents. We’ve asked a few of them to share their thoughts with you in some honest and short videos which we encourage you to view here.

City of Raleigh Policy of Nondiscrimination. Sec. 4-1004.

(a) The policy of the City of Raleigh is, and shall be, to oppose any discrimination based on actual or perceived age, mental or physical disability, sex, religion, race, color, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, familial or marital status, economic status, veteran status or national origin in any aspect of modern life.

(b) The administration, committees, commissions, and boards of the City are hereby directed to use their full power and resources, as by law duly given, to prohibit and discourage discrimination as hereinabove mentioned.

(c) The City Manager and the City Attorney are directed to include within the terms of all contracts of and grants from the City a nondiscrimination provision which will carry out the effect of this section; provided that nothing in this section shall be construed to encroach upon the powers or immunities of the State or Federal governments.

(d) The City Manager is directed to establish such policies as will insure that there is no discrimination in any function or area of City government.

(e) All citizens of the City, individual and corporate, are hereby requested and urged to use their power and influence to the end that this City shall be one of equal opportunity for all citizens.

Wake County employees and applicants cannot be discriminated against based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, genetics, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, family status or political affiliation. As a board and as a County, we remain committed to those principles.

 

Updates

Statement from the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE)
in response to the repeal:

"ASAE is encouraged that the N.C. legislature has recognized the damage that HB2 has done to the state's economy and reputation. The compromise reached by lawmakers and Governor Cooper's office is not a perfect deal, but it does have bipartisan support, including from the Governor's office. ASAE also wants to reaffirm its support for our members, industry partners and convention authorities in N.C. whose efforts to promote the state have been hurt by this damaging law."
- ASAE president and CEO John Graham, FASAE, CAE

The Greater Raleigh Convention and Visitors Bureau's (GRCVB's) response to ASAE's statement: 

"GRCVB is thrilled that ASAE is once again open to hosting meetings in N.C. with the recent repeal of HB2."
- Dennis Edwards, president & CEO, GRCVB

Statement from the International Association of Exhibitions and Events (IAEE):

"N.C. and Raleigh are open for business! We're thrilled that HB2 was repealed!"

Statement from the Professional Convention Management Association (PCMA):

"We are delighted to see the advocacy efforts of our industry and others helped advance measured progress with the repeal of N.C.'s HB2. While there is more work ahead, our hope is this first step proves the state's willingness to endeavor further to protect their citizens and visitors from any and all discriminatory legislation. The convention, meeting and hospitality professionals of N.C. should be applauded for their unrelenting fight for the repeal of HB2 and can now get back to work delighting their guests."

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